Fintech finds a way to reach domestic workers with financial services in Mexico


Lola, a single mother of three, earns a living cleaning houses in Mexico City. She gets paid in cash every week, and asks for an advance from her employers when she really needs it, like when her mother passed away in her village and she had to cover transportation and funeral costs or when she was mugged on a public bus. Lola stores small sums of money at home to pay for food, rent, electricity, water and gas.

As is the case with many domestic employees, her job is informal and unsecured. Sometimes, she has to miss work when her kids get sick and, depending on the employer, she may or may not get paid for those missed days. She is unfamiliar with her labor rights and her employers, who are primarily concerned with employee retention, are generally oblivious to their legal obligations.

Although Lola uses several financial instruments to make ends meet, pay her bills and provide for herself and her children, her transactions generate no records in the financial system, thus making her invisible to banks and other financial institutions- read more.